Lock your doors and hide the kids…the JLPT is coming!

Newbies and oldies alike — JLPT season is once again upon us!

Key Dates
Note: These are a bit more accurate than what was said at Fukushima Orientation.

August 17 – Applications become available at major bookstores around Fukushima. However, according to this site, they will only be available in one bookstore in Fukushima City and one in Iwaki. If you can’t find a bookstore near you that sells applications, you should either contact your local international center or call BONJINSHA Publishing Company at 03-3263-3959 and order the application directly from them.

Mid-September – Applications will be due. Don’t zone out and miss this date!

December 6 – Exam date

July 5, 2010 – Next exam date (only for levels 1 and 2)

Useful Materials
JEES Japanese Language Proficiency Test: This website has a wealth of information concerning the test, from FAQs about the JLPT to application procedures to current news. If you have any general questions about what the JLPT is, this is the site for you.

The JLPT Study Page: This is the study guide that I have sworn by for the JLPT 4 and 3 tests. It was made by a former test taker and tells you everything you need to study for JLPT levels 4 through 2 in terms of kanji and vocabulary. It even has some old practice quizzes that you can study from. Its grammar portion is glaringly lacking though, so for grammar you should instead go to…

JGram – The Japanese Grammar Database: This is a site that I just found recently but am already in love with. Not only does it highlight all of the key grammar and sentence patterns that you need to know for each level of the JLPT, but it also gives numerous examples and has a comment section that may further clarify any questions you may have.

JLPT Kanji Project: Having trouble with kanji? This site will definitely help you out. It includes printable kanji lists that are classified into JLPT levels. It even allows you to save kanji and vocab to your own personal folder so you can test yourself with them later. But if staring at a computer screen isn’t your thing…

White Rabbit Press – Japanese Kanji Flashcards Vol. 1: Here’s some good advice that has been handed down to me, which I will now pass on to you: DON’T MAKE YOUR OWN FLASHCARDS! The JET Programme pays pretty decently, why not splurge on some flashcards and save yourself the time and hassle? These cards will not only help you with the necessary JLPT kanji, but they will also teach you other common words that use the same kanji.

Final Thoughts
As I said during Fukushima Orientation, everyone has a different way of studying. Some of these links may help you, some of them may not. However, if you’ve got a bit of spare time at work or at home, these resources are worth giving a look!

Also, I passed JLPT 4 when I first got here, without any prior Japanese study, so it is totally doable! For those of you who have at least a year under your belt, you should definitely try for JLPT 3!

Lastly, if any of you know of any other quality resources for studying for the JLPT, please leave a comment! Thanks!

This entry was posted in Lifestyle, Japan, Study and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Lock your doors and hide the kids…the JLPT is coming!

  1. Tatami Potato says:

    this is an awesome site for learning Kanji – http://readthekanji.com/
    also http://www.speedanki.com/ is good for learning readings

    this mildly complete grammar list is hilarious too
    http://www.e-japanese.jp/grammar.htm

    with such useful everyday examples like:

    Girl friend ga neteiru aida ni 2nd girl friend to date shimasu- I will date with 2nd Girl friend while my girl friend is sleeping

    Boyfriend ga shigoto shite iru aida ni nemasu – I will sleep while my boyfriend is working

  2. AngelaS says:

    Great advice, thanks! The only thing I would add is DO make your own flashcards. I’ve found that since I have never studied Japanese before, the patterns in kanji make more sense if I am writing them out. I also tend to remember them a bit better, even if it’s just on an “oh hey, I recognize that kanji” level.